Podcast: Injectable Microchips, 2D Transistors, AI For Spacecraft Diagnosis

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Podcast: Injectable Microchips, 2D Transistors, AI For Spacecraft Diagnosis

In this episode, we talk about the injectable microchip from Columbia University along with its applications in clinical settings, a global effort to develop two dimensional transistors, and a NASA Pathways Intern who created an AI powered system capable of detecting spacecraft failures.

In this episode, we talk about the injectable microchip from Columbia University along with its applications in clinical settings, a global effort to develop two dimensional transistors, and a NASA Pathways Intern who created an AI powered system capable of detecting spacecraft failures. As always, you can find these and other interesting & impactful engineering articles on Wevolver.com.

 

EPISODE NOTES

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(0:42) - Injectable Microchips:

Researchers at Columbia University have developed a microchip the size of a grain of salt that can be injected into a patient and act as a wireless temperature sensor. The chip is powered by and communicates to a standard ultrasound probe from outside the body. 

(9:00) - 2D Transistors:

Moore’s law has dictated the progress of computational power for the past few decades but lately, it seems like we’ve hit the physical limit of transistor development. There’s now an international effort led by MIT and UC Berkeley to explore 2D transistors which could pave the way for keeping up with Moore’s Law again. 

(17:10) - AI For Spacecraft Diagnosis:

NASA Pathways intern Evanna Gizzi has been working on Research in Artificial Intelligence for Spacecraft Resilience (RAISR) which aims to autonomously detect the root cause of spacecraft failures. RAISR is like an AI engineer that lives in the brain of a spacecraft to identify and remedy spacecraft failures.

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About the podcast:

Every day, some of the most innovative universities, companies, and individual technology developers share their knowledge on Wevolver. To ensure we can also provide this knowledge for the growing group of podcast listeners, we started a collaboration with two young engineers, Daniel Scott Mitchell & Farbod Moghaddam who discuss the most interesting content in this podcast series. 

To learn more about this show, please visit the shows page. By following the page, you will get automatic updates by email when a new show is published.

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