Multi-Electrode Printed Bioelectronic Patches for Long-Term Electrophysiology

Using thin-film electronic patches or the so-called electronic "tattoos" for biomonitoring is paving the way for the future of healthcare in terms of better signal quality, higher patient comfort and wearability.

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Multi-Electrode Printed Bioelectronic Patches for Long-Term Electrophysiology

Using thin-film electronic patches or the so-called electronic "tattoos" for biomonitoring is paving the way for the future of healthcare in terms of better signal quality, higher patient comfort and wearability. 

A) Depending on its shape and placement in the body, the proposed adhesive patches can be used for detection of multiple electrophysiological signals: brain waves (EEG), eye movement (EOG), neuromuscular activity (EMG), cardiac activity (ECG), and respiration. B) The various layers and components that compose the e-patch. C) Schematic model of the trinary microstructure of the biphasic conductive polymer. Adapted with permission from Ref. Copyright 2021 American Chemical Society. D) Fully printed flexible adhesive patch on a patterned background, evidencing the transparency of the substrate. E) Rigid analog front end.

Recently, in an article published in Advanced Functional Materials, researchers from the Carnegie Mellon University (USA) and the University of Coimbra (Portugal) have proposed a novel implementation of digitally-printed electronic bio stickers for high resolution electrophysiological monitoring. Applications include Electrocardiography (heart monitoring), electroencephalography (brain activity monitoring), electrooculography (eye movement monitoring) or electromyography (recording of muscle activity) both for hand gesture classification and detection of facial expressions.

For the first time, a multi-application patient-specific biomonitoring system based on printed soft electronics has been proven to work for more than five days over the body, even when doing exercise and taking daily showers. 

As well, it has been shown that the thin-film skin-interfacing electrodes (printed using a soft conductive ink) benefit from a lower electrode-skin impedance when compared to clinical grade Ag/AgCl electrodes, leading to better signal quality while also improving patient comfort.

Researchers are now looking for partners to implement a co-development plan and license this patent-pending technology.


Read more: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/adfm.202205956

Soft Printed Microelectronics Lab, Soft Machines Lab

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